Great Moments In Literature

This will be an occasional series where I post discussions of Great Moments in Literature. The series will focus on the famous and infamous stories about authors and their books.

#1 A Night to Remember (Doyle, Wilde and a famous dinner)

#2 An Author’s Worst Nightmare (Lawrence of Arabia loses the only copy of his book)

#3 A Reclusive Genius (Darger creates an outsider art novel which astounds with its genius and length)

#4 A Brief History of the World’s Most Unread Book (Stephen Hawking writes a best-selling book no one read)

#5 Inventing the Detective (Edgar Allan Poe invents the detective genre)

#6 The Disappearance of the Best-Ever Selling Author (Agatha Christie goes missing)

#7 A Very Hungry Best Seller (The revolutionary and extraordinary book The Very Hungry Caterpillar)

#8 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Poisons Himself (Through self-experimentation)

#9 Rediscovering a Very Very Lost Work (The time a ‘library’ which had been buried for over a millennia was accidentally discovered)

#10 The Answer My Friends (The time the Nobel Prize in Literature was awarded for music)

#11 Go Set a Watchman (The time a Pulitzer Prize winning novelist published a first draft)

#12 An Unbelievable True Story (Controversy when an author makes something up).

#13 1984’s changed ending (An author changes one expression and alters the meaning of their entire novel)

#14 Oh my Lord (The most unusual motive for writing a novel, leads to a bestseller).

#15 Unfinished business (Manuscripts authors died while writing)

#16 An unusual bible (An esoteric text that contains more than it appears).

#17 How to get away with attacking your enemies in literature. (The small penis rule)

#18 A fantasy book which is secretly an attack on mathematics. Forthcoming.

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